Bad auto insurance comes in many forms. With bad car insurance, premiums are higher than they should be, or the company offers low premiums but minimal coverage. Some car insurance companies have poor customer service and don’t effectively communicate the status of your auto insurance claim. Others require you to use only repair shops that they approve of, and those shops can be inconvenient to access, forcing you to travel across town for repairs or wait weeks for an appointment. Still other auto insurance companies don’t have a comprehensive network of adjusters, so you have to wait longer for your claim to be processed so you can get the repairs you need. In a worst-case scenario, a car insurance company may not have the financial resources to pay claims, leaving its customers high and dry.
As it currently stands with Texas, in the event of an accident, there’s a one in seven chance that the other driver won’t be insured. Unless you’ve purchased uninsured/underinsured motorist (UM/UIM) coverage, that’s money out of your pocket. Texas’s minimum requirements also don’t account for comprehensive coverage, which you’ll definitely want to take into consideration, since the state ranks first for monetary losses from “catastrophes” like hail storms and hurricanes.
As it currently stands with Texas, in the event of an accident, there’s a one in seven chance that the other driver won’t be insured. Unless you’ve purchased uninsured/underinsured motorist (UM/UIM) coverage, that’s money out of your pocket. Texas’s minimum requirements also don’t account for comprehensive coverage, which you’ll definitely want to take into consideration, since the state ranks first for monetary losses from “catastrophes” like hail storms and hurricanes.
Auto insurance is financial protection, and not just for the investment you made when you bought your car. After a really serious accident, bills for damage and injuries can easily reach into hundreds of thousands of dollars. If you happen to cause such a wreck, the victims could sue you. In the worst case scenario, assets such as your savings and home could be seized.

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Please note that this website provides only a summary of auto insurance, written to illustrate in general terms how auto insurance works. Your insurance policy is the legal contract that contains the terms and limitations of your coverage. You should carefully review the contents of your policy. All products and coverages are subject to availability and limitations. Whether an accident or other loss is covered is subject to the terms and conditions of your insurance policy.
Now as to Hartford, I have had them for years and claims for uninured motorist on my car ins and for storm damage on my roof due to large hail. Both claims settled satisfactorily. Cost to the company will never be recovered thru cost of my policies. Also policy cost is in line with other large companies but defiantly not cheap. I just received a quote from Liberty Mutual on my car insurance $400 less that Hartford. However the agent seemed reluctant to send me the quote via email. I thought this strange since I wanted to verify the coverage was he same as I have, he said I just reviewed the coverage (via phone call) to which I replied I didn’t record the conversation so please send me an email detailing the cost and coverage, He stated he would but that was a couple hours age and still haven’ heard back. Go figure.
If you insure more than one vehicle, you may be able to stack your uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage. For example, let’s say you cover two vehicles on the same policy and each vehicle has a standard $25,000 in uninsured motorist protection. If you have stacked coverage and sustain injuries in a crash caused by an uninsured driver, you’ll be able to draw from both payouts for a combined total of $50,000 in coverage.
Gap insurance is insurance that may be required if you lease or finance a car. Gap insurance covers the difference between what your car is worth and what you owe on your auto loan should your car be a total loss in an incident. For example, let’s say you have a car loan with a balance of $20,000, but your car is only worth $15,000. If it’s totaled in an accident, your insurance will only pay out $15,000 and you will owe $5,000 to settle your loan. If you have gap insurance, that policy will pay the $5,000 to settle your loan balance.
Additional living expenses, or loss-of-use coverage is typically a fixed amount – 20% of your dwelling coverage. However, if you live in an area prone to wildfires or hurricanes, it's worth checking with your insurer to see if they offer higher coverage limits in the event a catastrophe forces you from your home for an extended period. Additional living expenses can add up, so it may be worth the added peace of mind to increase this coverage component.
Each insurance company evaluates personal factors in its own way, and they keep their methods as hidden as possible. So we can’t tell you which company puts high value in your occupation or emphasizes a clean driving history more than others. But to help you get going, we can show you a car insurance rate comparison for the same hypothetical driver and car, using average rates from across the country.

Farmers has the fifth-largest market share in Texas at 8.2%. According to J.D. Power, Texans are more impressed with their Farmers claims experiences than they are with Allstate’s. Unfortunately, Consumer Reports readers expressed a bit more annoyance with the timeliness of their payments when comparing Farmers to State Farm and Allstate. Farmers’ financial strength is also a couple of notches lower than the rest. This doesn’t mean that the company's about to go bankrupt — it’s just the difference between “quite stable” and “completely rock-solid.”

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